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SGEM#190: Wee are the Champions of Pediatric Urine Samples

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Featured, Genitourinary, Infectious, Pediatrics, Podcasts | 4 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM190 Date: September 26th, 2017 Reference: Kaufman, et al. Faster clean catch urine collection (Quick-Wee method) from infants: randomised controlled trial. BMJ April 17. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Natalie May trained as an emergency physician with subspecialty paediatric emergency medicine in the UK and worked in Manchester and Oxford before moving to Australia in 2015 to work for Sydney HEMS. She’s been there for the last 18 months working in prehospital and retrieval medicine and then in Emergency Medicine. She is a medical education enthusiast and has been an editor and regular contributor to the St. Emlyn’s blog and podcast since 2012. We appeared on stage at SMACC Chicago doing a parody of Jimmy Fallon’s Tight Pants skit. Case: You are working the afternoon shift in the paediatric emergency department. It has been the usual busy after-school, after-work time. Your shift is...

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SGEM#180: The First Cut is the Deepest – N.O.T. for Paediatric Appendicitis

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Pediatrics, Podcasts | 4 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM180 Date: May 24th, 2017 Reference: Georgiou et al. Efficacy and Safety of Nonoperative Treatment for Acute Appendicitis: A Meta-analysis. Pediatrics 2017. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Ross Fisher is a Paediatric Surgeon in Sheffield, England. When he is not waxing lyrical about presentation skills (P Cubed) over at ffolliet.com, giving the Greatest Presentation in the World at SMACC or expounding his views on paediatric trauma management he can be found at Sheffield Children’s Hospital principally dealing with surgical oncology, vascular access and all sorts of neonatal surgical problems. Case: It is 7pm on a quiet evening in the emergency department and Bobby comes in. He’s 12 years old and complains of a belly ache, pointing to his right iliac fossa pain. It has been going on for about 36 hours now, initially peri-umbilical and associated with nausea, poor appetite and malaise.  It has increased...

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SGEM#177: POCUS – A New Sensation for Diagnosing Pediatric Fractures

Posted by on May 7, 2017 in Featured, Musculoskeletal, Pediatrics, Podcasts | 41 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM177 Date: May 1st, 2017 Reference: Poonai et al. Point-of-care ultrasound for non-angulated distal forearm fractures in children: test performance characteristics and patient-centered outcomes. Acad Emerg Med May 2017. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Corey Heitz is an emergency physician in Roanoke, Virginia. He is also the CME editor for Academic Emergency Medicine and the associate editor for emergency medicine simulation at the AAEM MedEdPORTAL SGEM HOP: This is another SGEM Hot Off the Press with Academic Emergency Medicine. Here is a reminder of how this special edition of the SGEM works: A paper that has been submitted, peer-reviewd, and accepted for publication in AEM is selected. The SGEM puts its skeptical eye upon the manuscript using the modified BEEM critical appraisal tool. One of the authors is invited to discuss their work on the SGEM podcast. A special SGEM Hot Off the Press blog is posted...

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SGEM#171: Step-by-Step Approach to the Febrile Infant

Posted by on Mar 12, 2017 in Featured, Infectious, Pediatrics, Podcasts | 6 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM171 Date: February 27th, 2017 Reference: Gomez et al. Validation of the “Step-by-Step” Approach in the Management of Young Febrile Infants. Pediatrics 2016. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Anthony Crocco is a Pediatric Emergency Physician and is the Medical Director & Division Head of the Division of Pediatric Emergency at McMaster’s Children’s Hospital. He is also the creator of SketchyEBM. Case: A 25-day-old girl presents with fever. There is no history of congestion, cough, vomiting, diarrhea, shortness of breath or any other focus for her infection. She looks well on exam and her vitals are normal except for a rectal temperature of 38.3C. She is less than 28 days old and you wonder how much of a work up to do (full septic workup, intravenous antibioticsadmission to hospital, blood and urine tests)? Background: Fever without source in infants less than three months old...

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SGEM#167: The Management of Bronchiolitis in Community Hospitals

Posted by on Dec 18, 2016 in Featured, Infectious, Pediatrics, Podcasts, Pulmonary | 12 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM167 Date: December 14th, 2016 Reference: Plint et al. Management of Bronchiolitis in Community Hospitals in Ontario: a Multicentre Cohort Study. CJEM November 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Chris Bond. Chris is an emergency physician and clinical lecturer at the University of Calgary. He is currently the host of CAEP Casts, which highlights educational innovations from emergency medicine residency programs across Canada. Chris also has his own #FOAMed blog called Standing on the Corner Minding My Own Business (SOCMOB). Case: Parents present to your community emergency department with their 6-month-old daughter. She has had a cough, fever, and “noisy breathing” for the past 24 hours. She is otherwise healthy, having had a previously uncomplicated prenatal, delivery, and post-natal course. Her immunizations are up to date. There is no family history of atopy or asthma. On exam she is febrile at...

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SGEM#166: Which febrile child with sickle cell disease should get a chest x-ray?

Posted by on Dec 4, 2016 in Featured, Hematologic, Pediatrics, Podcasts, Pulmonary | 15 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM166 Date: November 21st, 2016 Reference: Eisenbrown et al. Which Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Disease Need a Chest X-Ray? AEM November 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Corey Heitz is an associate professor of emergency medicine at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine in Roanoke Virginia. He is also the CME editor for Academic Emergency Medicine and the associate editor for emergency medicine simulation at the AAEM MedEdPORTAL. Case: You are working in the Emergency Department on an overnight pediatric coverage shift. A worried mother brings her 2-year-old child in with a fever of 38.6C (that’s 101.5F). The female child’s medical history is significant for sickle cell disease. On exam, the child is uncomfortable appearing, tachycardic, tachypnic and febrile. Mom says the child has had a runny nose and a mild cough along with the fever. Background: Children with sickle...

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