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SGEM#206: I’m Wheezy Like A Pre-Schooler – Prednisolone for Wheezy Children

Posted by on Feb 10, 2018 in Featured, Infectious, Pediatrics, Podcasts, Pulmonary | 10 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM206a Date: February 6th, 2018 Reference: Foster SJ et al. Oral prednisolone in preschool children with virus-associated wheeze: a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet January 2018 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Tessa Davis is a Pediatrician specialising in Pediatric Emergency Medicine and currently practicing in a central London hospital. She is also the co-founder of Don’t Forget the Bubbles and on the FeminEM Speaker Bureau. Case: Tom is a 4-year-old boy who comes into the emergency department with a wheeze following a viral illness. He has been taking salbutamol at home today but he’s still not improving. He has mild work of breathing and a bilateral wheeze. His oxygen saturation is 94% on room air. Tom has no other previous medical history. You start to write up the salbutamol, but should you give him a dose of prednisolone too? Background: We see “little wheezers”...

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SGEM#203: Let Me Clear My Sore Throat with a Corticosteroid

Posted by on Jan 20, 2018 in Featured, Infectious, Pharmacology/Toxicology, Podcasts, Pulmonary | 5 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM203 Date: January 15th, 2018 Reference: Sadeghirad B, et al. Corticosteroids for treatment of sore throat: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. BMJ 2017 Guest Skeptic: Meghan Groth is an Emergency Medicine Pharmacist at the UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Massachusetts. She has contributed to the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine and EM PharmD blogs, and is a part of the ALiEM Capsules Team.  Case: 50-year-old man presents with a one day history of sore throat, cough and low-grade fever. He is otherwise healthy with only sports related injuries. The ibuprofen did not help and he is requesting antibiotics so he can get back to work sooner. Background: Patients present commonly to their primary care providers (PCPs) and to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of a sore throat. In the US, adults accounted for 6.6 million visits...

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SGEM#200: Dr. Alexander Hamilton and Bloodletting for Camp Fever

Posted by on Dec 23, 2017 in Featured, Holiday, Infectious, Podcasts | 1 comment

Podcast Link: SGEM200 Date: December 19th, 2017 Reference: Lesassier Hamilton A. Dissertatio Medica lnauguralis De Synocho Castrensi [Inaugural medical dissertation on camp fever]. Edinburgh: J Ballantyne, 1816. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Robert Leeper is an assistant professor of surgery at Western University and the London Health Sciences Centre.  His practice is in trauma, emergency general surgery, and critical care with an academic interest in ultrasound and medical simulation. This is the 200th episode of the SGEM and it is the 2017 holiday edition. The idea for this episode came after seeing a twitter photo on Halloween of Dr. Leeper (@Rob_Leeper) doing rounds dressed up as Alexander Hamilton. To be clear, Dr. Alexander Lesassier Hamilton was a Scottish physician who lived around the early 1800s. He is a completely different person than one of the founding fathers of the United States. The American Alexander Hamilton family was...

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SGEM#195: Some Like It Hot – ED Temperature and ICU Survival

Posted by on Nov 19, 2017 in Featured, Infectious, Podcasts | 4 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM195 Date: November 11th, 2017 Reference: Sundén-Cullberg et al. Fever in the Emergency Department Predicts Survival of Patients With Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Admitted to the ICU. Critical Care Medicine 2017. Guest Skeptic: Jesse Spurr works as a Nurse Educator in the Emergency Department at Redcliffe Hospital in Australia. Outside his family and work, Jesse pours energy into his professional hobbies: healthcare simulation podcast Simulcast, nursing practice development blog and podcast Injectable Orange and faculty and team member of The Teaching Coop. Jesse classes himself a lifelong student of teaching, learning, health and human performance. Case: You are working night shift in the emergency department. Two patients present to the front desk in close succession, brought in by concerned family members. Both are similarly hypotensive and tachypnoeic,drowsy but orientated, with hot, reddened and increasingly painful cellulitis. Following the triage sepsis pathway,...

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SGEM#190: Wee are the Champions of Pediatric Urine Samples

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Featured, Genitourinary, Infectious, Pediatrics, Podcasts | 4 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM190 Date: September 26th, 2017 Reference: Kaufman, et al. Faster clean catch urine collection (Quick-Wee method) from infants: randomised controlled trial. BMJ April 17. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Natalie May trained as an emergency physician with subspecialty paediatric emergency medicine in the UK and worked in Manchester and Oxford before moving to Australia in 2015 to work for Sydney HEMS. She’s been there for the last 18 months working in prehospital and retrieval medicine and then in Emergency Medicine. She is a medical education enthusiast and has been an editor and regular contributor to the St. Emlyn’s blog and podcast since 2012. We appeared on stage at SMACC Chicago doing a parody of Jimmy Fallon’s Tight Pants skit. Case: You are working the afternoon shift in the paediatric emergency department. It has been the usual busy after-school, after-work time. Your shift is...

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SGEM#174: Don’t Believe the Hype – Vitamin C Cocktail for Sepsis

Posted by on Apr 9, 2017 in Featured, Infectious, Podcasts | 25 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM174 Date: April 6th, 2017 Reference: Marik et al. Hydrocortisone, Vitamin C and Thiamine for the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Retrospective Before-After Study. Chest Dec 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Jeremy Faust is an attending emergency physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston Massachusetts and an instructor at Harvard Medical School. He’s the co-host of FOAMcast with co-host Dr. Lauren Westafer and he’s written about sepsis in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, EM Clinics of North America, and for mainstream audiences in Slate.  Case: A 60 year-old man is admitted to the ICU with severe sepsis from pneumonia. He has a history of hypertension and diabetes. You are providing him with intravenous fluids and appropriate antibiotics. When speaking with the family his son asks about a vitamin C cure he just read about? Background: We have covered...

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