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SGEM#152: Movin’ on Up – Higher Floors, Lower Survival for OHCA

Posted by on Apr 24, 2016 in Cardiac, Featured, Podcasts | 10 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM152OHCA Date: April 22nd, 2016 Guest Skeptic: Jay Loosley. Jay is a Registered Nurse, Paramedic and Research Assistant. He was a Professor at Fanshawe College but is currently the Superintendent of Education for Middlesex-London Emergency Medical Services. Case: A 43 male patient calls with chest pain from 14th floor of a downtown high-rise apartment building. After the 911 dispatcher gets the address and details of the chest pain, the patient stops responding and the dispatcher can hear no voice. The paramedic response time is 4 minutes with lights and sirens to the apartment. The paramedics enter the controlled access area and buzz the apartment number. Of course the patient doesn’t answer because he is vital signs absent. The paramedics look on the control panel for a building superintendent, and attempt to buzz them. Of course he isn’t in his...

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SGEM#151: Groove is in the HEART Pathway

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in Cardiac, Featured, Podcasts | 5 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM151 Date: April 10th, 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Salim Rezaie. Salim is an Associate Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine Internal Medicine University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and the creator/founder of REBEL EM @srrezaie. Salim is also part of The Teaching Course. Background: There are approximately 8 to 10 million patients complaining of chest pain coming to emergency departments in the United States annually. In the US, a very liberal testing strategy is used in order to avoid missing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with chest pain. This results in over 50% of emergency department patients with acute chest pain receiving serial cardiac biomarkers, stress testing, and/or cardiac angiography at an estimated cost of $10 to $13 billion annually and yet fewer than 10% of these patients are diagnosed with ACS. To add further angst to emergency department...

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SGEMXtra: Enter the METRIQ

Posted by on Apr 3, 2016 in Featured, Podcasts | 0 comments

Podcast Link: SGEMXtra METRIQ Date: March 23rd, 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Brent Thoma. Brent is an emergency physician, trauma team leader, Clinical Assistant Professor and the Director of EM research at the University of Saskatoon in Saskatchewan. As of July 1st, he will become the EM Program Director. Brent was last on SGEM#56: BEEM Me Up (Impact Factor in the Age of Social Media). He was discussing the new idea of social media, impact factor and medical education with Dr. Chris Carpenter. Chris had just published a new study in AEM looking at how the BEEM rater score correlated with traditional journal impact metrics. This is a SGEMXtra so there will be no critical review. We will instead be discussing the following three things: Healthy Skepticism Free Open Access to Medical Education (FOAMed) METRIQ Study. Healthy Skepticism: People often think skeptics are close...

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SGEM#150: Hypertonic Saline for Traumatic Brain Injury

Posted by on Mar 27, 2016 in Featured, Neurologic, Podcasts, Trauma | 20 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM150 Date: March 24th, 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Chris Bond. Chris is an emergency physician and clinical lecturer at the University of Calgary. He is currently the host of CAEP Casts, which highlights educational innovations from emergency medicine residency programs across Canada. Chris also has his own #FOAMed blog called Standing on the Corner Minding My Own Business (SOCMOB). Lead Author: Dr. Elyse Pelletier. Elyse works at the Centre de Recherche CHU de Québec, Population Health and optimal Health Practices Unit. She is also in the Department of Family and Emergency Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada. Case: A 21-year-old male is standing on the corner, minding his own business (SOCMOB) when he is hit in the head with a bat and suffers a severe traumatic brain injury. He is brought into the trauma room and appears to have...

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SGEM#149: Share Decision Making for Pain Control in Older ED Patients

Posted by on Mar 21, 2016 in Featured, Podcasts | 4 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM149 Date: March 10th, 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Tim Platts-Mills. Tim is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Director, Clinical Research; Co-Director of Geriatric Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina. His career goal is to improve the quality of emergency care for older adults through research, research mentorship, and support of the larger community of geriatric emergency medicine researchers. Tim’s research group is currently developing a protocol to screen for elder abuse in the emergency department. He also serves as a decision editor in geriatrics for Annals of Emergency Medicine. Case: 78-year-old female with history of osteoporosis trips and falls while rushing between flights at the airport. She arrives to your emergency department with right wrist pain and after your evaluation you order an x-ray that reveals a Colles’ fracture. No other injuries are identified. After...

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SGEM#148: Stuck on You – Skin Glue for Peripheral IVs

Posted by on Mar 13, 2016 in Featured, Podcasts | 7 comments

Podcast Link: SGEM148 Date: March 6th, 2016 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Simon Carley. Simon is Professor of Emergency Medicine in Manchester, England. He is a keen educator and loves sharing what he knows through the blog and podcast at St. Emlyn’s. Case: You are working hard in the emergency department. It is a busy night and you are working flat out dealing with the stream of patients. In the middle of this busy night one of your nurses asks you to resite an IV on an 80-year-old lady with confusion and urosepsis. You had placed the IV yourself under ultrasound guidance earlier and it took some time and effort. The line has ‘fallen out’ and she needs re-siting before heading off to the ward. Your nursing colleague asks if you want to glue this one to stop it from getting pulled out? Background:...

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